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Photo of Mikio Aoi
Mikio Aoi
Assistant Professor

Dr. Aoi is a computational neuroscientist interested in studying how populations of neurons coordinate their activity to perform computations. In particular, his interests are in understanding how the dynamics of neural computations impact behavior and in developing principled approaches to data analysis in close collaboration with experimentalists.

Before pursuing an interest in neuroscience he earned a bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology from California State University, Long Beach and a PhD in Mathematical Biology from North Carolina State University studying the dynamics of cerebrovascular function in stroke patients.  As postdoctoral associate in the Department of Mathematics at Boston University he developed statistical methods for characterizing rhythmic synchrony in neuronal populations. He then moved to Princeton University, where he continued his postdoctoral training with Jonathan Pillow, developing scalable methods for analyzing high dimensional datasets of neuronal activity in animals performing perceptual decision making tasks.

As a native of Southern California, Dr. Aoi is thrilled to return to California to join the outstanding students and faculty at UCSD in the Halıcıoğlu Data Science Institute and The Department of Neurobiology – Division of Biology.

Photo of Virginia de Sa
Virginia de Sa
Professor, HDSI Associate Director Cognitive Science

Associate Director de Sa is a leader in the fields of cognitive science, neuroscience, computer science, engineering, and data science. Her research utilizes multiple approaches to increase our understanding of  how humans and machines learn to perceive the world around them.

She earned her Ph.D. and master’s in Computer Science from the University of Rochester, and a bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Engineering from Canada’s Queen’s University.

Photo of Gal Mishne
Gal Mishne
Assistant Professor

Mishne’s research is at the intersection of signal processing and machine learning for graph-based modeling, processing and analysis of large-scale high-dimensional real-world data. She develops unsupervised and generalizable methods that allow the data to reveal its own story in an unbiased manner. Her research includes anomaly detection and clustering in remote sensing imagery, manifold learning on multiway data tensors with biomedical applications, and computationally efficient application of spectral methods. Most recently her research has focused on unsupervised data analysis in neuroscience, from processing of raw neuroimaging data through discovery of neural manifolds to visualization of learning in neural networks.

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Armin Schwartzman
Professor

Armin Schwartzman’s research encompasses theoretical and practical aspects of statistical signal and image analysis in a variety of scientific applications. These include spatio-temporal and high-dimensional data analysis, geometric statistics and smooth Gaussian random fields, with applications in biomedicine, the environment, neuroscience, genetics and cosmology.

Armin Schwartzman received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology; and his PhD in Statistics from Stanford University. He was an R&D engineer at Rockwell Semiconductor and Biosense Webster, and has held faculty positions in Biostatistics at Harvard University and Statistics at North Carolina State University.

Photo of George Sugihara
George Sugihara
Professor

Sugihara is a theoretical ecologist who has performed foundational work in the data analysis of complex systems from fisheries to medicine to finance. He gained renown for developing, with Lord Robert May, methods for forecasting chaotic systems, providing the first example of chaos in nature with the diatom populations at Scripps Pier. He has worked with the major institutions on questions of systemic risk and on detecting early warning signs of critical transitions, including the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and The Bank of England. He also worked with fisheries to develop a currently enacted market-based incentive plan for reducing wasteful bycatch and to improve forecasting of wild fish stocks. His current interest in neurobiology and genomics includes collaborations with the Salk Institute for Biological Studies to apply EDM to neurobiology and to problems in gene expression in cancer.

Photo of Yusu Wang
Yusu Wang
Professor

Yusu Wang obtained her PhD degree from Duke University in 2004, and from 2004 – 2005, she was a was a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University. Prior to joining UC San Diego, Yusu Wang is Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Department at the Ohio State University, where she also co-directed the Foundations of Data Science Research CoP (Community of Practice) at Translational Data Analytics Institute (TDAI@OSU) from 2018–2020.

Yusu Wang primarily works in the field of geometric and topological data analysis. She is particularly interested in developing effective and theoretically justified algorithms for data analysis using geometric and topological ideas and methods, as well as in applying them to practical domains. Very recently she has been exploring how to combine geometric and topological ideas with machine learning frameworks for modern data science.

Yusu Wang received the Best PhD Dissertation Award from the Computer Science Department at Duke University. She also received DOE Early Career Principal Investigator Award in 2006, and NSF Career Award in 2008. Her work received several best paper awards. She is currently on the editorial boards for SIAM Journal on Computing (SICOMP), Computational Geometry: Theory and Applications (CGTA), and Journal of Computational Geometry (JoCG). She is elected to serve on the Computational Geometry Steering Committee in 2020.

Website: yusu.belkin-wang.org

Photo of Frank Wuerthwein
Frank Wuerthwein
Professor

Wuerthwein is the Distributed High-Throughput Computing Lead at San Diego Supercomputer Center and executive director of the Open Science Grid (OSG), a national cyberinfrastructure to advance the sharing of resources, software and knowledge. His research focuses on distributed high-throughput computing with large data volumes. His research in experimental particle physics research includes searching for new phenomena at the high-energy frontier with the CMS detector (Compact Muon Solenoid) at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva. He worked on the team that discovered the Higgs Boson, popularly known as the God particle.

Photo of Rose Yu
Rose Yu
Assistant Professor Computer Science and Engineering

Dr. Rose Yu is an Assistant Professor at the UC San Diego, Department of Computer Science and Engineering. She earned her Ph.D. in Computer Sciences at the University of Southern California in 2017. She was subsequently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. She was an assistant professor at Northeastern University prior to her appointment at UC San Diego.

Her research focuses on advancing machine learning techniques for large-scale spatiotemporal data analysis, with applications to sustainability, health, and physical sciences. A particular emphasis of her research is on physics-guided AI which aims to integrate first-principles with data-driven models. Among her awards, she has won Google Faculty Research Award, Adobe Data Science Research Award, NSF CRII Award, Best Dissertation Award in USC, and was nominated as one of the ’MIT Rising Stars in EECS’.

Website: http://roseyu.com