Cross-Departmental Faculty

Benjamin Smarr

Benjamin Smarr

Assistant Professor

Benjamin Smarr is an assistant professor at the Halicioğlu Data Science Institute and the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, San Diego. As an NIH fellow at UC Berkeley he developed techniques for extracting health and performance predictors from repeated, longitudinal physiological measurements. Historically his work has focused on neuroendocrine control and women’s health, including demonstrations of pregnancy detection and outcome prediction, neural control of ovulation, and the importance of circadian rhythms in healthy in utero development. Pursuing these and other projects he has won many awards from NSF, NIH, and private organizations, and has founded relationships with patient communities such as Quantified Self. With the COVID-19 pandemic, he became the technical lead on TemPredict, a global collaboration combining physiological data, symptom reports, and diagnostic testing, seeking to build data models capable of early-onset detection, severity prediction, and recovery monitoring.

Headshot of Armin Schwartzman

Armin Schwartzman

Professor

Armin Schwartzman’s research encompasses theoretical and practical aspects of statistical signal and image analysis in a variety of scientific applications. These include spatio-temporal and high-dimensional data analysis, geometric statistics and smooth Gaussian random fields, with applications in biomedicine, the environment, neuroscience, genetics and cosmology.

Armin Schwartzman received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology; and his PhD in Statistics from Stanford University. He was an R&D engineer at Rockwell Semiconductor and Biosense Webster, and has held faculty positions in Biostatistics at Harvard University and Statistics at North Carolina State University.

Contact

Email: armins@ucsd.edu

Headshot of Stuart Geiger

Stuart Geiger

Geiger studies the relationships between science, technology, and society — not only how science and technology have substantial impacts on society, but also how they are social institutions in themselves. He studies issues of fairness, accountability, transparency, responsibility, and contestability in machine learning, particularly in online content moderation. He has examined how values and biases are embedded in these technologies and how communities make decisions about how to use or not use them. Geiger also studies the development of data science as an academic and professional field, as well as the sustainability of free/open-source software and scientific cyberinfrastructure projects.

Geiger earned his Ph.D in 2015 at the UC Berkeley School of Information and the Berkeley Center for New Media, then was the staff ethnographer at the UC Berkeley Institute for Data Science. He joined UCSD in 2020, jointly appointed as faculty in the Department of Communication. Geiger is a methodological and disciplinary pluralist who collaborates across many different ways of knowing, but his work is often grounded in the fields of communication & media studies, science & technology studies, cultural anthropology, organizational sociology, human-computer interaction, and history and philosophy of science.

Contact

Email: sgeiger@ucsd.edu

Yoav Freund

Professor

Freund works on applications of machine learning algorithms in bioinformatics, computer vision, finance, network routing and high-performance computing. His current research focuses on machine learning to develop and analyze adaptive algorithms that change their behavior by learning from examples, rather than by re-programming.

He served as a senior research scientist at Columbia University in computational learning systems, and in machine learning development for AT&T Labs (formerly Bell Labs).

Contact

Email: yfreund@ucsd.edu

Headshot of Arun Kumar

Arun Kumar

Assistant Professor

Kumar is a member of the Database Lab and Center for Networked Systems and an affiliate member of the AI Group, specializing in artificial intelligence. Systems and ideas based on his research have been released as part of the MADlib open-source library, shipped as part of products from EMC, Oracle, Cloudera, and IBM, and used internally by Facebook, LogicBlox, Microsoft, and other companies. His current work focuses on simplifying and accelerating the processes of data preparation, model selection, and model deployment – complementing his primary research interests in data management and software systems for machine learning/artificial intelligence-based data analytics.

Contact

Email: arunkk@eng.ucsd.edu

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Jingbo Shang

Assistant Professor

Jingbo Shang is an Assistant Professor in CSE and HDSI at UC San Diego. He obtained his Ph.D. from CS@UIUC. He received his B.E. from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China. He is broadly interested in data mining, natural language processing, and machine learning. His research about mining and constructing structured knowledge from massive text corpora with minimum human effort has been recognized by many prestigious awards, including the Grand Prize of Yelp Dataset Challenge in 2015 and Google Ph.D. Fellowship in Structured Data and Database Management in 2017.

Contact

Email: jshang@ucsd.edu

Jelena Bradic

Professor

Bradic is an Associate Professor of Statistics, and winner of multiple teaching awards. She directs the Statistical Lab for Learning Large-Scale and Complex Data. Her interests include ensemble learning, robust statistics and survival analysis. Her application areas include gene-knockout experiments, understanding cell cycles, developing new policies or detecting effects of treatments onto survival, Her research also reaches into the area of causal inference and developing new learning algorithms that can make new scientific discoveries but also quantify uncertainty with which these discoveries are being made. Her multidisciplinary expertise in handling data has expanded her research into multidisciplinary fields that include political science, marketing, engineering, public health as well as biomedical sciences.

Contact

Phone: 858.534.3992

Email: jbradic@ucsd.edu

Headshot of Alex Cloninger

Alex Cloninger

Assistant Professor

Cloninger’s research interests are in applied harmonic analysis, machine learning and neural networks, analysis of graphs and data sets sampled from continuous geometric structures embedded in high-dimensional spaces, and applications in various scientific domains.

Cloninger researches problems around the analysis of high dimensional data. He focuses on approaches that model the data as being locally lower dimensional, including data concentrated near manifolds or subspaces. These types of problems arise in many key scientific disciplines, including medicine, imaging, and artificial intelligence. And the techniques developed relate to a number of machine learning and statistical algorithms, including deep learning, network analysis, and measuring distances between probability distributions.

Contact

Phone: 858.534.3992

Email: acloninger@ucsd.edu

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Rayan Saab

Associate Professor

Rayan’s work is on the mathematics of information, data, and signals. His research is broadly motivated by problems in the acquisition, digitization, and processing of data. For example, he is interested in sampling and quantization, compressed sensing, sparse  and low-dimensional representations of data, as well as inverse problems like phase retrieval and blind source separation.

Before joining UCSD as an assistant professor in 2013, he was a visiting assistant professor and a Banting postdoctoral fellow at Duke University (2011-2013). Before that, he completed his PhD at the University of British Columbia in 2010, where he was a member of the Institute of Applied Mathematics.

Contact

Phone: 858.534.3992

Email: rsaab@ucsd.edu

Mikio Aoi in front of a window with equations written on it

Mikio Aoi

Assistant Professor

Dr. Aoi is a computational neuroscientist interested in studying how populations of neurons coordinate their activity to perform computations. In particular, his interests are in understanding how the dynamics of neural computations impact behavior and in developing principled approaches to data analysis in close collaboration with experimentalists.
Before pursuing an interest in neuroscience he earned a bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology from California State University, Long Beach and a PhD in Mathematical Biology from North Carolina State University studying the dynamics of cerebrovascular function in stroke patients.  As postdoctoral associate in the Department of Mathematics at Boston University he developed statistical methods for characterizing rhythmic synchrony in neuronal populations. He then moved to Princeton University, where he continued his postdoctoral training with Jonathan Pillow, developing scalable methods for analyzing high dimensional datasets of neuronal activity in animals performing perceptual decision making tasks.
As a native of Southern California, Dr. Aoi is thrilled to return to California to join the outstanding students and faculty at UCSD in the Halıcıoğlu Data Science Institute and The Department of Neurobiology – Division of Biology.

Contact

Email: maoi@ucsd.edu

Headshot of Molly Roberts

Margaret “Molly” Roberts

Associate Professor

Roberts research lies at the intersection of political methodology and the politics of information, with a focus on methods of automated content analysis and the politics of censorship in China.  Roberts co-directs the China Data Lab, which is part of the 21st Century China Center at the School for Global Policy and Strategy.

She earned her Ph.D. in government from Harvard, and both her master’s in statistics and bachelor’s in international relations and economics from Stanford. She joined UC San Diego in 2014. Her recent book, Censored: Distraction and Diversion Inside China’s Great Firewall, was published in 2018 by Princeton University Press.

Contact

Email: meroberts@ucsd.edu